The wisdom and compassion a woman can intuitively experience in childbirth can make her a source of healing and understanding for other women.
— Stephen Gaskin
"By sharing our birth stories, we shift the cultural lens that is placed on birth. It allows us to get a clearer, more well-rounded picture of the true diversity of childbirth. Each woman has her own path to follow and no two births are the same.” -Beth Moonstone, CPM

"By sharing our birth stories, we shift the cultural lens that is placed on birth. It allows us to get a clearer, more well-rounded picture of the true diversity of childbirth. Each woman has her own path to follow and no two births are the same.”

-Beth Moonstone, CPM

Birthtellers

Most women today have never witnessed a birth other than the highly inaccurate and dramatized portrayal on TV and movies.  Our culture has lost sight of the unique art of birth storytelling and the social woman-to-woman connection that is necessary to an expectant mother’s knowing about childbirth.  The most powerful way we leave our legacy for future generations that will birth after us, is to tell our own stories. 

“The unique art of storytelling illuminates the specialness, subtlety, and emotional components of birthing (1). Because these highly-charged variables are minimized or absent in formal childbirth education, sharing birth stories becomes more long-lasting as wisdom is passed from “one who knows” to those “who need to know” (2).”

Birthtellers is a designated time for women to gather together in a safe space and share their experiences and expectations of childbirth with one another.  This time is meant to be mutually beneficial for the storytellers and listeners.  The mothers sharing their stories can find validation and healing while naturally spurring dialogue for real life learning as they pass down their pearls of wisdom to compassionate listeners.  It becomes equally important to share difficult stories and positive stories in order to defuse fear, build confidence, and pass down subjective knowledge. The passing down of birth stories creates a cognitive matrix that guides women to reflect, learn from one another and prepare for birth. 

 

 

VBAC:CBAC Collective

With one in three mothers in our country giving birth by Cesarean Section {33.4% in Tennessee}, we want to provide a relative and resourceful time for women to meet together and discuss pertinent topics related to all things Cesarean Birth.  

The VBAC:CBAC Collective is a time for those who desire to put their feelings and thoughts about birth into action.  It's a facilitated time for processing experiences, finding your voice, having your voice be heard and being empowered through continued education and activities.  Whether you've had a planned or unplanned Cesarean Birth, or are hoping to have a Vaginal Birth After Cesarean, this group could serve as a beneficial time of connecting with other mothers who are similarly situated.  Come and share your experience and knowledge and be an empowering resource for others or simply come and receive support and a compassionate ear.  

 

Breastfeeding & Bonding 

Today's culture expects new mothers to grow, birth, and feed our babies from our bodies and then at 6 weeks, jump back into a normal routine filled with normal life activities requiring normal levels of energy.  

This group is an educational time for mothers to come together and share in their experiences of navigating the amazing season (and vulnerable challenges) of the 'fourth trimester'.  Discussions include all things breastfeeding, pumping, baby wearing and bonding. 

 

I didn’t know the beauty of my body until I was pregnant. I didn’t know the strength of my mind until I gave birth. I didn’t know the depth of my love until I held my baby.
— Emma Bird

(1) Boykin & Schoenhofer, 1991.     (2) Walker, 1984; Bruner, 1990.